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  1. Jear77 12 months ago

    Define easier

    I can answer from both standpoints.

    When I thought I was a christian, I constantly asked myself “is this the best path? What else should I be doing? How can I best serve god? Have I confessed my sins? Am I sinning in some way that I need to confess? Is there something more to this? Am i truly saved?” The list of questions went on and on and on. As god didn’t reveal himself in all his glory then, those questions remained unanswered… and studying his word further and asking for guidance only left me frustrated and the more and more I looked into it, I found that I could not find agreement 100% with ANYTHING that it said, as each person has to live their own life, and not be bound by a set of rules.

    As an atheist, I can (technically) do what I need to do in any situation I have the skills or can talk or bribe (should I have the money) someone to do those things that I may find personally distasteful. Having said that, I’m not trying to go out and be the worst person possible. I make mistakes… but I have learned not to care, because why should I? If I’m on the right side of the dirt, I’ve not flat-lined, another day will come by tomorrow, and a chance to correct things – even if it’s months, years, or decades after the fact. And if I can’t? Guess what? It wasn’t meant to be! And even when i die… the same thing will be said. So if life goes on irrespective of my actions (even were I to do something morally reprehensible or illegal)… what difference does it make at day’s end? None.

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      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @Jear77 hmmm, I suppose religion is a very subjective experience. For me it was different when I was a part of organized religion. I didn’t think about it as much, just went about blindly accepting. I have wondered if life would be easier if one were a religious person, and they always felt that God was in control, leaving them with less worry and angst about existence?

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  2. fosheet 12 months ago

    From my understand (which isn’t much because I have been opposed to organized religion my entire life), I took the route of winging it, and just doing what I felt to be best, what would make me be the best person I could be, make it easy to sleep at night, not weighing on my concious, etc.

    I feel like being a devout religious person gives a sense of stress by doing the right thing, trying to help other people find god, praying, going to church, reading the Bible, preaching the gospel to help others find god or religion like the devout have done. It’s almost like walking a tightrope, knowing I need to do these things in order to get into heaven, etc. Everyone makes mistakes, but you can ask for forgiveness, etc. It all seems very stressful.

    Myself, having avoided all the religion hype. I opted to live my life the best way I could, only answering to myself. Did I help the old lady across the road, did I smile at that stranger because they looked sad and sometimes it feels good to be seen. Did I do the very best I could do to spread as much positive vibes and words and actions as I possibly could, given the mood for the day. Did I steal, talk nasty about others, like, cheat, kill someone? I feel like my intentions have always been in the right place (the majority of the time) and when they weren’t I recognized it, gave myself a pep-talk and made damn sure tomorrow I would try harder. It wasn’t stressful to me to live my life like that. Does it make me wrong, keep me out of heaven, etc. Well I don’t have the answer, but I know no one else does either.

    Most recently, I’ve been baptized, and I went to church for the first time in forever. I’m not opposed to it, but I won’t just follow blindly, it still must align with what i, personally, deem moral and aligns with my beliefs. If it doesn’t then I will find something else.

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      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @fosheet I am curious as to why you made the decision to be baptized now. Do you feel this relates to a broken heart?

      I had thought differently than you on the religion issue especially when it comes to life and death angst. it seems like religious people handle death and illness better with beliefs such as “he’s in a better place.” “he’s at peace now.” believing they will see their dead loved ones could bring about a certain comfort not available to nonbelievers who have to contend with their beliefs that this is all there is.as for my own belief, I just think that your atoms and molecules that are sustainable go out and reassemble someplace else when we die, not like reincarnation, more like usable energy.

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      • fosheet 12 months ago

        @Scarlett that was something I have always felt the urge to do, but there were various mental obstacles, and past grievances in my way.

        Oddly enough, my ex is the one who helped me work through those things, and gave me the sense of security that I needed to go through with it… It even happened after we broke up. My spirits tell me that’s what he was meant to do in our relationship, therefore, I trusted them and followed through with it.

        Does this mean I will sit in church every Sunday or read the Bible all the time, no. Does it mean my heart feels more at peace now than it previously did, yes.

        As for death, (classifying me as a non-believer to an extent) I have never been afraid of death. I’m not quite convinced of what happens next, if I will see loved ones again, etc. But I’m ok with it, I always have been. There energy is still around me, I just can’t physically touch them.

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  3. five2one 12 months ago

    Christians are chosen, though many hear the message. And they are the nobodies in this passing age.

    I am not an ordinary Christian, more like a tactical operative for the Kingdom of God. My life did not begin with this life I live. I seemed to have lived as a spirit and at least one other physical incarnation.

    I have studied atheism, but that is meaningless to me. Atheism does not provide eternal life, for one thing. Beyond that, my own life experiences far out strip anything an atheist could know.

    While I am not an angel, I do spend most of my time with angels. I have seen an angel remove their human disguise and show their exalted body. The same sort of body promised to Christian. And, otherwise, I have extensive experience with angels which means I have seen them possess people at will – even many at the same time – and change their own earthly persona.

    Their ability to change from one humanly disguise to another is mind bending.

    For my own self, I seem to already have the promise of an imperishable body. While I can change my appearance depending on circumstance, generally I am a 47 year old man who passes for his late twenties (and worse).

    I can not say how delightful that is.

    One of my favorite moments of amusement in that was this last year when I had this terrible boss… while he was droning on about how his age has taught him, he stopped and asked me my age. I told him. His jaw dropped. I explained it was because of “positive thinking”. Lol.

    It disturbed him.

    He is probably 53 or something, but has balding grey hairs, wrinkles, and who knows what sort of medical ailments.

    I really am very hard to kill. I have drowned and simply walked out of it, in one instance, and survived another drowning at an early age. In my teens I used to drive with my friends where my camarro had a bumper sticker, “I brake for beer”. I was typically black out drunk while driving. It was a bit before Lost Boys came out, but that was that lifestyle.

    This year I bled out because of a substantial hole in my stomach lining. It felt like a gut shot for that week. I hid it. But, by the weekend I could not stop puking, and went to the hospital. Turned out I was bleeding out by shitting copious amounts of blood, and vomiting copious amounts of blood.

    Right now, for the most part, few see this. My kids see it, and that delights me. Such a thing is hard for people to really process. With my family, it sends the message that ‘all is not as it seems’. They are family, so this is norm for them. But, on a deep level they get it.

    There’s a lot of people who would do anything to have eternal life.

    Usually, people never see my age, so I blend in fine.

    As an example though, that boss, he did not stop talking or in anyway stop me and go, “That is not by positive thinking, what is the truth”. People just go the way they go. And those who think themselves as knowing everything… they won’t change their ways even if the dead should rise and testify to them.

    I don’t have to worry about government eventually discovering me, because angels are government.

    Life ways… I am very laid back. I relate with characters like “the Dude”, from the big lebrowski.

    Anyway, the truth is, God chooses who lives long and who dies. Someday soon, those who fail to live to 100 will be considered as cursed by God. And those just over hundred, as but mere infants.

    That is, I am not the only one of my kind. There will be a lot of humans like me, if that has not already happened.

    You might wonder if this is really Christianity, and I can only assure you, it is. The promise of immortality is explicit as a promise in the teachings of Jesus.

    And contrary to misinformation, Heaven comes to earth. Not like UFOs, but in our hearts, and in the hearts of others from Heaven. More like invasion of the body snatchers where the angels could be anyone. Not V, “we come in peace” sorts.

    Like the Lord’s prayer, “Thy Kingdom Come, your will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven”. In Revelation, this is partly shown as a city coming down from the Heavens and landing on planet earth. (Though, again, the real Kingdom of Heaven is a tad bit more stealth, one does not literally see it descend. It appears. It is.)

    So, yeah, let’s see, atheism over the secrets of the universe, crazy enormous power, vast beauty in new bodies, immortality…

    I look at these sorts, they age, they die, and all without the slightest clue.

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    • Author
      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @five2one that is interesting. I pass for younger, too. I dunno if what you say about atheism is true, tho. There are atoms and ,molecules that survive death and remain as energy in the universe, so in a way they live on. I think where people get stuck is believing that the ego program is them. Do you believe your ego program is you?

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      • five2one 12 months ago

        @Scarlett No, I deal with angels. They are immortal, and that is something anyone gets from them. A decade or so before I was made aware of these angels being around me, I saw one change from a human form to an exalted, heavenly form. So, that was ample proof of immortality right there.

        One angel I knew in the late 90s, as a for instance, showed how she could appear in different physical forms of varying age. I have seen this in other angels as well. So, this is further proof I have had for sentient human like beings having immortality.

        I certainly do believe many humans have souls, while others have a love for money and their stomachs. This is a defilement of the soul and leads to having their soul wiped.

        That is the tradeoff: a person can seek God and love God, or not and lose their soul.

        The trick in this, however, is ultimately such routes are not really “free will”, but rather those of this world do not inherit immortality, but those not of this world do.

        Not sure what you mean on the ego program, though if I put it into this model, I would see that as the illusion of this world. As the path those of this world take. They certainly do not have beliefs of that not of this world. When they show that they do, it is not true.

        As for me, and ego program, I deal too much with the Heavenly to have much of an ego. I am said to be extremely meek, though, so that sort of person tends to not have much ego.

        I have accomplishments in this world, but really it was not my own, but God’s. Outside of certain angels and family, I really have no friends and not really any interest in anything of this world, but for some good film and music.

        I also like stuff, such as modern toilets and air conditioning and such. Not sure what my previous life was, but very sure we did not have these niceties.

        I do believe I have lived before, but this is where I am staying.

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  4. Yin 12 months ago

    For me personally, an atheist. I don’t have to worry with extra rules or the idea of an afterlife. I understand how nothing after this life could be a lot harder on someone though. I also understand if someone needs or wants the idea of a being who loves them no matter what and is looking after them. I stayed worried with the world around us. I don’t need any more. Just depends if you need/want “an angel” and/or need/want rules to follow. Oh, and then you have the jerks on either side who make life hard for others. So, I guess it also depends on the area as well.

    For here in America, I would say probably Christian, so as long you aren’t the kind tries to change laws and whatnot based around Bible laws (basically Christian sharia.) They do that, and then they become targets. Christians can go by in this country without many issues though. They are the majority so they are treated as normal people for the most part (again, aside from the people trying to make the life of others worse or if they run into some terrible antitheist.) Open atheists have issues running for political office. We tend to have to deal with coming out to family or whatever. I’m still not comfortable telling most of my family, but it isn’t something that really needs to come out at the moment anyway since it isn’t a big part of who I am.

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      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @Yin this is quite interesting! I mean, as long as you are not having to pretend and live in a way that is not authentic, you don’t really have to share your beliefs with family. You’re under no obligation.

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  5. ladybarbara 12 months ago

    I don’t think of myself as atheist. I believe there is a great Mystery Power of the Universe, just not a man in the sky, spook in the sky, or entity in the sky. God is unknowable, fully unfathomable to my human mind. It is indescribable, but a Mystery Power of the universe, just the same. My relationship with the Power is personal. If life went my way, I would keep it personal and not share it, or socialize in it.

    I started out life getting sprinkled and/or dipped in water in a Catholic church. But the family did not attend that church, except for my cousin Jessi. Jessi was the only child that had to be Catholic and do Hail Mary’s, those chest hand signals, and attend Mass and Catholic school. I don’t know why she was forced to be such a punishing religion.

    At 5 years old, I went to the Church of Religious Science in Orange County, CA. Mom would pack all the kids she could into an old green Tucker car. That car easily held 17 kids, if two got into the back window well, and three sat on the floor in front where the dashboard of other cars would be —- in the foot well of the passenger seat. Church was at a drive-in theater and we’d pull into a parking spot and put the speaker in the window. Rev. Robert Schuller would be up at the screen saying, “Come as you are, but stay in your car, please!!!” We packed into that old Tucker car on Sunday’s, dressed in night gowns, pajamas, socks, slippers, and hair rollers. While the sermon was being preached, we would be crawling all over the seats of the car, getting night clothes off and getting dressed. We took rollers out of our hair and brushed each other’s hair. After church we went to Schribner’s Drive-in for burgers and malts all around the car served in window trays.I don’t remember the lessons, but they were about mind over matter, the power of positive thinking, and metaphysics. Heck, I didn’t need metaphysics, or any kind of physics. Us kids had enough physics when Grandma gave us all Castor oil and Lane’s Tea. I don’t remember any lessons about Jesus, but on Easter we got Easter baskets and a new Easter outfit.

    Mom fell in love with a Jewish man and our household was to become Jewish. Mom and I had to convert to Judaism. It meant learning a lot of lessons out of the first part of the Bible and I would parrot back whatever lesson Dad was pounding in to me. I became a parrot, but the good thing was at temple, we sat in the women’s section and kept our mouths shut. I could sleep in temple. I did not retain any of the lessons. I only learned what I had to just to get by for the moment. The God they prayed to? Well, I recited the words of prayers, but I don’t believe an entity in the sky can hear them. On Easter, Mom made me an Easter basket and I got an Easter outfit —- which I wore to temple on Saturday. I had no understanding of Easter beyond Hard boiled eggs and chocolate. Jewish was hard because I had to parrot back the lessons.

    My Grandma was a Baha’i and the lessons she tried to teach her grandkids about, well, they went in one ear and out the other. I was 33 years old when I discovered the Baha’i Faith. It was familiar to me, because it was the same stories that Grandma used to tell to all her grandkids. It is hard to be a Baha’i and having to go to prayer meetings every 19 days, or having to teach the Baha’i Faith to others. I don’t like to teach. And the prayers? I don’t think there is a spook in the sky listening to them, but I read them anyway. I am not a good Baha’i, especially in my old age. There are two head-strong control freak women in my Baha’i community and they take strong lead while I clam up and rarely speak. Nothing makes me quieter than pushy, head strong control freaks. The more they want to drum into my head, the more I forget and don’t care that I forgot.

    I’m just me and the older I get, the more “me” I become. It is easier to just sit there and have the religion simply fly past my head and not sinking in. I guess I have always been like that. It is easier to just be me. I say the shortest prayer to myself, “O God!” and listen to the tone of my voice to measure how I am feeling. Sometimes I say that same shortest prayer in Farsi, “O Allah!” But if I say it in public, someone Hispanic will answer, “Ola!”, as if I said, ” hello” in Spanish.

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    • Author
      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @ladybarbara that’s quite a history. Why do you think you stay involved with the Baha’i women?

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      • ladybarbara 12 months ago

        @Scarlett In my childhood, my Grandma tried so hard to teach her grandchildren about the Baha’i Faith. Looking back on those days, it was very disheartening to her that her teachings went right over our heads. Each of us kids ( about 20 kids) had our own religion going on at home. Only Jessy was Catholic and the rest of us were various Christian sects. When Grandma had us line up around the beds and say our prayers, Jessi had to kneal with her knees on a hard stool and recite a bunch of Hail Marys. The rest of us had so many different prayers that our voices blended together — sounding like a school cafeteria. Grandma hardly heard my prayer that was: “Now I lay me down to sleep — with my head between my feet — If I die before I wake — blame my stinky feet, for goodness sake.” Grandma would put us to sleep by reading letters from Lua Getsinger, the Baha’i that wrote to her and brought her the Baha’i Faith. I still did not get it, that Grandma was teaching us about the Baha’i Faith. None of us figured that out. Then, one day I talked to Grandma about religion because Mom married Dad and he was forcing me to convert to Judaism — and I hated the lessons. Grandma asked me to look at the Baha’i Faith. She showed me a picture she had of “Abdul”. She had a talent for telling the future. She made a living from telling fortunes reading tea leaves and coffee grounds. She said that I was the only one of all the grandkids that will become a Baha’i — although, at the time, I had no idea how that would happen. I struggled with becoming a reluctant Jew. That eased up when I married a Southern Baptist and then clung to what Judaism I had left, like clinging to a life vest. When I was 33 years old, Grandma died and I watched as her adult children gave her a bizarre Catholic funeral. I watched as NOBODY, except Jessi, knew what to do in a Catholic Church.

        I had left my 3rd husband and struck out on my own — getting a job at a local factory. Suddenly my life was surrounded with Baha’is. Out of 300 workers in the factory, 295 of them were Baha’i. My boss had a picture of Abdu’l-Baha in his office and I made my big decision to become a Baha’i under that picture in my bosses office. My Mom gave me Grandma’s picture of “Abdul” and I was moved to tears to see that it was an early picture of Abdu’l-Baha. It dawned on me how hard it was for Grandma to teach and teach to dead-headed kids that had no idea what she was trying to teach us. That was when the Baha’i Faith would become my last religion — no matter what.

        I have encountered many hard-core and pushy Baha’is in the last 38 years. I even tried to become one myself. Then, I met Immortal Pirate and I stopped going to Baha’i meetings. I was like a ship that lost it’s sails, motor, and rudder. I was drifting aimless and did not even know how sad I was, until a local Baha’i came to my door and invited me to join again. The depression lifted and I was going to meetings again. But, my memory is leaving me and I am refusing to teach. The pushy women in my Baha’i community simply lead the way and I become quiet and mousy and let them lead. I don’t want to teach and don’t want to show that I have the capabilities of teaching. I would rather sit mute. When asked why I don’t teach the Baha’i Faith to Immortal Pirate, I said that if he became a Baha’i and got all weak and nammy-pammy henpecked like the Baha’i men seem to be, I would have to leave him. I don’t want a man that loses his strong masculinity and becomes a henpecked weenie. One man in our community has a vegetarian wife and Immortal Pirate was amused that the man is in the back yard eating hot dogs and passing hot dogs to his son (who is supposed to be vegetarian). Another man is living a glutan-free life and having to sneak wheat flour snacks behind his wife’s back. I want to shout for them to stand up to the women and eat a big bloody juicy steak and a loaf of normal bread. Why do I put up with these woman??? Because the Baha’i Faith meant so much to my grandma and I know she is watching over me. I don’t mind being silent and refusing to teach the faith. I sit and eat veggies and glutan free glop-bread knowing it will be just an hour of this and I can return to a home that has a strong Captain who believes in God and loves Jesus. Yes, I even get rebellious and bake Christmas cookies to give to the glutan-free husband at the time of year when Christians are celebrating Christmas. I’m naughty like that.

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      • ladybarbara 12 months ago

        @Scarlett I’ll bet you think that being Baha’i is like Christian, or Jewish faiths — where you can go to another church or synagogue, if you don’t like the one you are going to. It is not that easy. Baha’is all have a number and ID card. We are registered by the city we live in. The records of the registry are kept in Illinois at the National Baha’i Center. Each city — in cities all around the world — has it’s own community of Baha’is. I live in Avondale, AZ, so, my community is the Baha’is of Avondale. I cannot just go to another city’s community meeting. I can only go to my own city community of Baha’is. Baha’is don’t meet at churches. We meet at each other’s homes and take turns holding the meeting in our homes. I have no other choice than to get along with the Baha’is of my community where I am registered to go.

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      • griz 12 months ago

        @ladybarbara
        I didn’t know that about the Baha’i.

        I’ve benefited greatly over the years and in my travels from just being able to show up at any church in participate with like-minded people.

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      • ladybarbara 12 months ago

        @griz We can’t do that. We can “visit” another community, if we know the house address of where the meeting will be, however, the visit will be announced to the members of that city’s community as a one time visit. I would still be registered to only go to my own city’s meetings. We have no clergy in the Baha’i Faith.

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      • griz 12 months ago

        @ladybarbara
        That’s interesting. So do you think it’s akin to a secretive organization?

        I cannot count the times in my travels when I’ve just spontaneously happened across a church or even just a group of people in the park (ie, a church picnic) where I’ve been welcomed in, treated like family, and left with a group of life-long friends in an area.
        It’s like a continent-wide (and likely world-wide) support and care group existing beyond clergy or secrecy. (Well, except in societies where it is still illegal! But even then I am highly confident I could make contact and give/receive support even with a language barrier!).

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      • ladybarbara 11 months ago

        @griz No, it is not a secretive organization. Anyone wanting to join can simply Google “The Baha’s of ______________________” (filling the name of their city in that blank.)

        If I knew of some Baha’i gathering and wanted to drop in and enjoy the occasion, I would be welcomed. I would be a visitor. However, my official paperwork would still have me listed as belonging to the Baha’is of Avondale, AZ. It is my city community where I belong.

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      • griz 11 months ago

        @ladybarbara
        That sounds like a good way to keep things under control.

        What downfalls do you think there might be in the more spontaneous kind of “just show up” participation I mentioned?

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      • ladybarbara 11 months ago

        @griz None, unless it was a meeting to discuss community business, then, as a visitor, I would have to sit in another room while private business is shared. I would be considered a non-community member. I have no problems with it. I don’t even want to go to all the meetings and celebrations of my own community, let alone go to another city’s meeting.

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      • griz 11 months ago

        @ladybarbara
        That’s an interesting point. It reminds me of several times when as a first-time visitor, I was invited to various Church business meetings (There was a social event afterwards and they did not want to just stick me in another room! Plus I already had some insightful conversations with the pastor and I guess he valued something in those conversations enough to invite me).

        In good and effective churches there is the idea that it’s really all the same “city”; and all citizens of “the city” can participate.

        In one meeting they were considering purchasing a very expensive and flashy sign, with the intent of inviting visitors and new people in. So they were very interested in the fresh perspective of someone who had seen their existing sign and just walked in.

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      • ladybarbara 11 months ago

        @griz It is the “just walk in” part where there would be a problem. We meet at the homes of the members and every “Baha’i Community” has Baha’i homes scattered around the city. Each Baha’i takes a turn holding the meeting at their house. Unless there is a way of announcing what home we are meeting in, it would be hard to find out where the meeting is. My community messages via gmail and an app called Group Me. We have Baha’i Temples and Centers, but they are built for members of every religion to come to. All religions are welcome in a Baha’i building of worship and come together in unity. However, the Baha’is in the city will still hold their meetings in each members homes, so, you might not find a Baha’i at the Baha’i Temple on our prayer meeting nights —- which are every 19 days.

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  6. griz 12 months ago

    While I’ve been angry at God, I’ve never been a “card-carrying” atheist. I guess I always accepted the concept of spiritual parentage; and while one can be angry with a parent, “divorcing” them is a terrible business at best (because it’s denying part of who you are).

    I’ve felt the at times the very heavy burden of the religious ideology of Christianity; the obeying of rules with the fear that any left unforgiven could ban be from “heaven” — even unto anguishing “unintentional” sins.

    The freed Spirit of Christianity is something quite different. Obedience of “rules” just sort of happens as side-effect when one’s heart and mind is in the right place with Life. Things change from trying to “earn and keep” favor . . . to simply knowing one has it as a spiritual child and knowing that “the rules” are really just a recipe for the greatest possible degree of success at all the various games that make up Life.

    But it’s not a cake-walk. With greater strength and competency one moves into arenas where both the challenges and rewards are greatly increased. But with increased competency one becomes more and more certain that one will be able to deal with whatever might come by.

    And then it sometimes does, just to see if you’ve actually been attending to personal and spiritual growth — or just talking a good talk.

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    • Author
      Scarlett 12 months ago

      @griz not sure what god you speak of.
      Are you referring to the Christian god? If you were born in Saudi Arabia, would you be speaking of the exact same god?

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      • griz 12 months ago

        @Scarlett
        Yes.

        But with still just an Abrahamic (Old Covenant) grasp of it.

        Hagar and Ishmael split off from the Abrahamic culture when it was still Old Covenant: a Covenant which laid the necessary foundation for the New Covenant where the way of living I mention is possible.

        Without it the concept of Fuller participation with God/Life (transcendent) is immature and not fully formed.

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    • Jear77 12 months ago

      @griz What if someone wants to (or deliberately needs to) sin simply because that’s their job… constantly? Prostitutes and hired hit men / governmental assassins fall into that category. In those types of instances… “obedience” really isn’t much of a choice.

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      • griz 12 months ago

        @Jear77
        Are you suggesting there are people who are no good for anything except self-punishment?

        Because that is what all of these things you mentioned ultimately do. All sin ultimately does.
        It pathologizes both the individual and the collective psyche; rendering it unfit for anything transcendent.

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      • Jear77 12 months ago

        @griz that might be their only skillset. Take what they have and run with it is what i say! Also, nowhere in the bible does it say that Rahab didn’t continue with her *ahem* profession (It’s called the world’s oldest for a reason!) after the walls of Jericho fell… for at least a time.

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      • griz 12 months ago

        @Jear77
        We should be very careful mixing up skill set with just that which comes easiest.

        People develop new skill sets all the time that do not involve murder or prostituting themselves.

        There’s also nowhere it says she did continue. There’s this concept that people who are delivered from a bad situation, sometimes decide not to return to it!
        They recognize that they were being pathologized; and are loathe to jump back into it again.

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      • Jear77 12 months ago

        @griz better hope said delivery doesn’t happen in the midst of the job at hand!

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  7. Novelist65 12 months ago

    Life is hard period. I don’t think it has much to do with your religious affiliation or lack thereof. I think perspective and the ability to problems solve have more to do an easier life or not.

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  8. luftballooneyegouge 12 months ago

    I would think it’d be Christians because of the networking.

    Most atheists who get together, seem too tired from patting themselves on the back to figure out crazy stuff like community bulletin boards fooor community, or grouped-nepotism.

    They should work on that.

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