For years it was my enemy: always working against me, running out at the most inopportune times, moments lasting an eternity when I wanted them to race by.

A new addition to my “toolbox-of-life” is the concept of time as an ally. I start each day with a prayer of “May the timing always be right”.
And then this primes me to look for when it’s working for me rather than against me. A series of delays happened today that I had a hard time not seeing as “annoying”. Even frustrating. They were threatening to steal my peace and joy.

I don’t know why these things happened. But on several occasions those delays have kept me out of an area where a major accident happened. Or helped me avoid a storm. Or put me face to face with someone who needed shoulder to lean on . . . and me with nothing but time on my hands.

So even when I might never know the possible silver lining for the timing not working out as I might have liked it . . . I still smile; perhaps even laugh, and assert that “The timing is always right”.

Is time your enemy, or your ally?




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  1. mamajoy 2 years ago

    For the most part it is my enemy. Not in the sense of inconveniences, but more in relation to the fact that it just goes by so quickly and sometimes I just want time to stand still.

    I’ve had a few moments when I think about my kids growing up and I feel very anxious and sad. It’s because I know I’m getting older and one day I won’t be around. Just typing that gets me teary-eyed. I know that you can lose your life at any moment and time isn’t the only reason for a loved one’s passing, but it my experience, it’s been the biggest reason.

    That’s why I don’t like time. There just isn’t enough of it.

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    • Spitfire3dC 2 years ago

      i can relate.

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      • mamajoy 2 years ago

        Have you found any way to positively deal with those realities? I just have to force those sad thoughts of of my head, even when I try to find the joy in seeing my family grow and excel I can’t shake that underlying sadness that sometimes creeps up on me. Way to rain on my own parade!

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      • Author
        griz 2 years ago

        I don’t want to wax too spiritual; but it’s more like the way to deal with those realities “found me” rather than me “finding it”!

        It’s just sort of happened over time as I devoted my focus to the spiritual path I’m on.

        While I don’t have any children of my own, there have always been children around me. Friends have shared theirs with me and even let me play godparent to them. I developed many meaningful and enduring relationship with children at my previous job, some of whom are now grown adults.

        And I’ve had to deal with several of them dying in accidents, a couple still as teens/children. And I can feel the sadness creep up on me. (People in the truckstop are wondering why I’m sniffling right now, as two truly precious ones come to mind. Shawn died at 13 in a hunting accident; Corey at 16 while exploring the realities of drinking-and-driving).

        But my joy is in the time I did have with them; and the remarkable young people they bloomed into . . . perhaps in small part because of my influence in their lives. Lives that while short . . . perhaps touched upon and positively influenced others who are still with us but whom I may never know in this lifetime.

        The reality is, that physical time marches on. But it is alleged that time is a nonsense concept in a Spiritual eternity.

        So how much of that can I spiritual reality can I celebrate in this physical temporality without being “so heavenly minded I’m no earthly good”?

        I’ll let you know when that limit is reached!

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    • Author
      griz 2 years ago

      Perhaps that’s the greatest motivation to not take a moment of it for granted.

      And I would confess that my growing spiritual philosophy has functioned in the background to take a lot of the stress off. My physical body is stamped with a “best before” date. But I have growing assurance that I am far more than just my physical body or 3 lbs of soggy grey saline mush.

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  2. Spitfire3dC 2 years ago

    I’d like to look at time more like you but I just don’t like how Monday turns to Friday so quickly. I used to have that experience of dislike with the speed of a weekend, but now it’s worse. A week feels like a second, a month like a minute and a year more like an hour. Maybe it’s because each time component becomes a smaller fraction of my overall life??Whatever it is; it seems more real than I’d like it to be.

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      griz 2 years ago

      I feel the passage of time. As a trucker I have to log and account for every moment of every day.

      But you have an excellent chance up-coming with your vacation. Take your wonderful wife and go find some lovely private spot in a colourful town, the soft fields or the red-soil oceanfront and consciously let time go. We used to do this as children all the time. All of eternity could exist in an afternoon of imaginative play.

      We have to exercise the concept of time being our servant . . . rather than the other way around. I still get caught up in deadlines and rat-races. But then a span of time like this current trip to Cape Breton Island, and practice means that I can more quickly let all of that “time-slavery” drop away.

      I spend just shy of an eternity one evening, exploring that little stretch of Atlantic shoreline that resulted in the few pictures I sent you.

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  3. Lucifer Rising 2 years ago

    This is a very good question, and one I grapple with quite a bit.

    Watching Twin Peaks renewal helped bring this as a bit of a resurgence to my mind, of late, as well as Logan, with my daughter (who looks uncannily like the little girl in the film).

    Logan, because Hugh Jackman is just two years older then me, but as my daughter said, I look “way, way younger then him”. Never mind the irony of the immortal, always young wolverine looking so old and haggard, at the end of his days.

    Twin Peaks, because this came out when I was 20, 21… same age as a number of the cast, and here they are, so many years later, and looking so very different, or, at other times, so similar to how they were.

    I haven’t really changed, though.

    I have also seen a lot of immortals, many I can not exactly recognize, others I certainly can. Different bodies, same person. Really, about the very same time I started to really get that message was about the same time almost ten years ago when I was starting to be actually concerned that I may not be aging… what do I do next? I would have to forge my identity, get new papers, start over somewhere.

    My teeth are falling out, some of them, but then, they have implants these days, and have already discovered how to regrow teeth, as well.

    I certainly have varieties of middle age stress I deal with. Nowadays, I enjoy a very enjoyable job, but I am not out there finding new breaking things which make the global news as I was in my 30s. (Early 30s.) But, then again, that was an enormous amount of work and stress to prove myself, and now I have all that on my resume and so much more.

    I am definitely not worried about any power larger then God and His Kingdom these days, that used to be a concern. Enormous amounts of resources could otherwise be put forward finding people like me, to scavenge and experiment on. But, I have angels all around me, and have seen the power of God… God can make people invisible. God can wipe people’s minds. And set every manner of spiritual boundary which effects the flesh and nations.

    Even today, it is certainly a testimony. Albeit, I do have a sort of baby, cherubic face, “angel/demon”, as does my wife (who is in the same place as me, though four years younger).

    If this condition continues to remain, as the decades roll on, the testimony will just be all that stronger.

    I used to have a very dour concern that everyone would transfigure, having seen what that literally looks like. I just have strong difficulty imagining a world where everyone walks around like that, interacting with what we have here, in place, now. Where, I do view a lot of it as good — as spiritual. It should be noted that when John said that “nothing in the world should be loved’, that he was in a world two thousand years ago, where there was not strong spirituality in music, cinema, and other forms of expression… as I definitely believe there is today.

    Being Generation X has been very interesting. Very likely, I have lived a number of lives, though, and very likely, this trend could continue. But, conversely, that may not exactly be true. And, to a degree, meaningless. As while we are individuals, we are also a singular, corporate being.

    Contrasting my life, there was nothing… then something.

    Memories even, the past, was in black and white. Then color.

    Like everything has been changing for the better, as I have been growing older, and absurdly so. Though, it is fascinating for me to contrast these experiences with those of my four children, who are millenials…

    One thing about Twin Peaks I started to think might happen, but did not, was “what if everyone stayed young”. Not entirely unheard of, as there was one actress who looked like she was in her forties, though she was seventy five, in American Horror Show.

    Ferris Bueller, Lost Boys… this stuff happened along side my own life and seemed so close. Highlander. This was the concept, even way back as a teenager, the concept of being unable to die. It was one of the earliest concepts I grasped as a young man, albeit, in no small part because of several major pivotal times I survived exactly that.

    These days, rarely am I so bold in such statements as I was when I was a teenager or in my late 30s. But, then again, these days, it was something inside me. Long since then, I have been around evidence of immortality in those around me considerably.

    There were more then a few terror times when I had to go through terrible scenarios like “what if there has been this community among human beings for centuries, hidden, undying”. Difficult to explain in a few words. Suffice it to say seeing these scenarios played out on television and dealing with it in real life are two very different things.

    And, these are two last matters there: such a community amongst the world is very different then how it is shown as yet in cinema, tv, movies, but, at the same time, today, immortality depicted is normal. Which really makes the world a much better place for me. Back in the 90s… I practically entirely abandoned television entirely. There was so little I could relate with.

    Lastly, human kind is not so far off from technically mastering immortality their own selves. No, they can not protect from all injury, that certainly is a condition, regardless. But, conceivably, they could be able to alter the genes live so as to remove the timers put in there.

    This sort of thing I actually view as a timetable matter, as a problem, not unlike how the tower of babylon was a problem.

    As it stands, there is one path where immortality is promised, aside from foolish legends about literal elixirs, or people having spied and made some manner of sense out of spiritual beings… by creating their mythologies of faeries, wood folk, gods, and the like.

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    • Author
      griz 2 years ago

      Consider that as children, we know what eternity feels like. Despite the machinations of parents and teachers trying to shackle us to the clock, we still know what it is like to “be timeless”. Weekends used to last forever. Summer was an eternity’s eternity. Two months was SO far off, it was like school never existed and never would again.

      Most adults lose this ability over time; and not just through good processes like growing life-experience and a keener awareness of the greater whole and the passage of time. A lot of it is lost (sacrificed?) to all kinds of temporal pursuits that in 50 years will not even be a mosquito-blip on time’s radar.

      Personally, I’ve had a very long and sustained haul of late. The “constraints of the clock” gnaw at my bones. But them something like this last glorious trip to Canada’s Cape Breton Island gave me “an excuse” to re-awaken the child who knows what timelessness feels like.

      I wish I could gift that to all of you. But I cannot.

      It’s something each adult has to consciously determine to re-awaken and nurture in themselves. Whether through vacations, grandchildren, or just daily being conscious of the value of every spare moment; making the most of it; and not rushing to fill up every spare moment with “meaningful distraction”!

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      • Lucifer Rising 2 years ago

        There is much I could say here…

        For one thing, I think some of the more remarkable moments I have had, have been moments when it has been “as if” stepping out of this reality, into what some apochropha call “the eternal aeon”. As if the two exist side by side, where time, specifically is entirely altered.

        These were relatively brief moments, but at the time, it seemed as if time stopped, as you seem to be mentioning.

        Time was much, much longer for me as a child, as you note. I recall specifically once asking my dad when we would go to the store or something, and he said “one hour”. It seemed like forever for me. Somewhere in this, I recall watching some old godzilla flick on tv (a “meme”, God later used with me to significant effect).

        My time and the perception of it, I do find, does seem to have something to do with what I call the size of my consciousness. Something very difficult to determine otherwise. Whatever can be said here, I have come to the conclusion we all experience time very differently. I can certainly state that, in retrospect, a very key element of time perspective, my own life – especially periods of extensive spiritual revelations, such as the 2007 – 2014 periods… seemed extremely elongated. In retrospect.

        Oddly, in retrospect, contrasting such period against periods of “rest” or general lack of severe and frequent revelations – including when, as a child, I had so very few which were consciously realized… these periods were significantly longer.

        Super massive events, frequently, made a year into decades.

        Fraudulent or semi-fraudulent backgrounds, such as we routinely experience in dreams, can certainly add a lot of perception of time where there is none. In dreams, very often we are in the middle of a life of experiences which we simply conjured up, so the reality has powerful staying power and time dilation.

        Hypnosis, really, always should be in quotes, but there have been specific research studies in it with time, there is an excellent free pdf out there on the subject, has shown that, like dreams, people can be given fraudulent backgrounds so that a few moments can become as appearing as extremely long periods of time.

        Trances… are common in long distance driving, I have found. And in viewing new vistas. There are reasons for both. And the core trance state is a sort of shutdown of the conscious mind, opening up our consciousness into the far, far larger “unconscious”, which has an entirely different life background then our “conscious”… so the elimination of time is pretty normal there.

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      • Author
        griz 2 years ago

        “These were relatively brief moments, but at the time, it seemed as if time stopped, as you seem to be mentioning.”

        I would suggest we can consciously nurture these experiences; and that if we don’t we are subconsciously suppressing them. There is a line to be drawn between child-like wonderment and desire to learn/grow, and selfish childish process. I think so many adults are “traumatized” by the need to appear mature, that they throw out both the childish AND the child-like (the latter being the process we value and crave from the children around us).

        “My time and the perception of it, I do find, does seem to have something to do with what I call the size of my consciousness.”

        I would call this “awareness of the greater now”: a “now” that far exceeds selfish preoccupation.

        “I have come to the conclusion we all experience time very differently”

        And perhaps that even that we CAN experience time differently, should we wish it. Is “time” our prison . . . or our play-thing? (As in, the way a child plays with something as a prelude to mastering it)

        Interestingly for me, the “elongated” periods of time coincided with times when I was learning/growing the most. I became most aware of protracted time as a child during harsh negative lessons; trauma and abuses that seemed to last forever. But I now “practice” having this happen during times of pleasant “growth-by-play”. And it seems the more I learn “positively”, the less I have to learn “negatively”!
        I would not exclude that my often difficult past worked to move my awareness of protracted time to where I was more conscious of it.

        An interesting segue into the realm of dreaming.
        Most dreams are the equivalent of brain-farts — a natural process of digestion of the day’s event. They become more “massive” (and linger longer in consciousness) when they are more critical issues from the past left roaming around inside us unreconiled. One Native Shaman called them “messages from the spirit-world; and maintained that if one kept open communications with the spirit world while awake (one’s own personal spirit and the Great Spirit), dreams would only be necessary if one closed down those waking-hour communication lines. He was very aware of spiritual things while awake, and by all accounts rarely slept for more than a few hours nightly — perhaps because there was little “processing and repair” work left to be done.

        re: driving trances. I’ve found that when the noise in the head subsides, one can be more aware of the “background” noise all around: whether that is a beautiful natural vista before you . . . or a subtle alteration in traffic-flow that indicates some yet-unseen hazard.

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      • Lucifer Rising 2 years ago

        Right, it is hard to think well of dreams, when you can so easily recall the statements which are derogatory about them in Scripture. Jude and Peter has the statement defining false ones as “dirty dreamers”. God states in the Old Testament effectively that even dreams from him are small potatoes compared to his word.

        When God spoke of Moses, he also spoke of other prophets, saying with Moses he speaks face to face, but with them, in riddle, in dreams and visions.

        For us, God does still speak in “riddle”, only He explains the meaning inwardly.

        You are good on timing, I had gone to sleep at 4am or 5am, woken up some around 6, then slept until 12pm. But, feel relatively well rested.

        Normally, I do like to get my sleep, and when I am very, very tired, my mind intoxicates me with the deepest desires of my heart in dreams… such dreams are very hard to wake up from.

        It is surprising, for me, to see how simple those desires typically are.

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  4. Jear77 2 years ago

    It’s a mixed bag, though mostly my enemy. Today I inadvertently took off work because I misread my schedule. I was told it wasn’t busy so it was OK. I needed the rest today anyways. So today it on my side. But I had basically 20 years of it being against me almost constantly. And the FEW times it was on my side didn’t make up for the bus being late to an employer who didn’t care why I was 5 minutes late to an interview and said, in essence “go away.” I’m like “really?”

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    • Author
      griz 2 years ago

      A tactic I make great use of is not to remain in the mindset of “time’s victim”.

      I may be momentarily upset over the inconvenience of not having something working out as I had hoped or planned. I assert to myself that somehow in some way, this will work to my benefit.

      And then I carry within me the mindset and the energy to help make it happen. (or at the very least, to not be so engrossed in a pity party I fail to see an unexpected door swing open!)

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  5. Thomas 2 years ago

    I don’t feel like time is my enemy. I feel like there is always time. There is plenty of time available. My enemy is not the time. My enemy is my failure to see and to act on the tens of opportunities that present themselves to me on a daily basis.

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      griz 2 years ago

      So in a way, ” the timing is always right”!

      It’s a very pleasant place/mindset to live in!

      Any thoughts on where you picked up this valuable life-skill?

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  6. eric 2 years ago

    Eh, I’d say time is the enemy right now. I can look at how my skill set is developing, and I can chart that progress and predict future growth during the next 12-18 months. The issue is getting to that point and looking back at today. Whatever I work on today will appear unpolished and lacking in so many ways at this future point. I’ll think it all was a waste of time – this tends to be my mindset today.

    Then i have to think 5 – 7 years from now. I’m learning that whatever I know today will probably be moot to a great extent by 2025 (empirical evidence demonstrates this). Sure, these future skills will transfer and help to build a foundation to learn new things, but I’ll still be back at square one looking ahead 12-18 months and being frustrated that I am nowhere where I want to be.

    What’s the story of the dude pushing the boulder up the hill? That’s a good use of time all right.

    We no longer live in a world where you get to learn one thing and just keep exploring that set of ideals during a lifetime. So I guess you have to learn how to use time because it’ll leave you behind – all of this is professionally speaking, obviously.

    I’ve been thinking a lot about coal miners recently – credit Trump. How those people use time to protest their benefits being cut, protesting environmental regulations, and trying to hold onto this thing their daddy, and their daddy’s daddy did with all of their time before either dying from a disease, drinking, smoking or some other not very healthy habit or activity.

    But I will disagree with “timing is always right.” Good timing has most certainly saved me many tickets, but I’ll call those coincidences because as we know, the notion that the universe is paying attention doesn’t jive with me. It’s all organized chaos that goes in circle, or something.

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      griz 2 years ago

      Don’t forget that our understanding of organized chaos is pre infancy at best! Who knows in what ways we might learn to exert influence over it.

      One of the great things about the Renaissance was it produced so many Renaissance men. Are you familiar with that term? Essentially they were not an intellectual or skill set “monoculture”.

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      • eric 2 years ago

        I have heard of the term, but never really thought to apply it a generation of people that must be multi-talented to even be given the slightest consideration of value. which I think describes the current situation of so many people, in particular, those in my age demographic.

        It might be worth reassessing whom the term renaissance man (or women) should be applied.

        Maybe we should also include followers on Instagram or likes on Facebook. Given how much time, in general, is given to browsing the creations of other people, those that manage to gain the eyeballs and subsequent time of others probably deserve special praise. If only time could be exchanged as currency. Like in the movie In Time with Justin Timberlake. :unamused:

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      • Author
        griz 2 years ago

        Michaelangelo, Leonardo DaVinci and Gallileo were all famous renaissanse men. They were able to make such advances because they had moderate expertise in many areas rather than just focusing on one. They saw a bigger picture, and had a broader perspective.

        And one can see a similar resurgence in people like Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Marconi. Because they were not over-specialized in just one field, they could craft solutions borrowing from many different fields.

        The era we “just missed” where one career in one specialized field saw one through life was probably very “comfortable”. But as you pointed out in the coal fields, there’s not a lot of innovation or incentive to do anything more than die of black lung just like one’s pappy. I’ve trucked to them, and they’re . . . well, something else. It’s probably a kindness to phase them out and release future generations from the prison of the mine. Yea, it will be short-term painful. But we need to remember that “there’s no such thing as ‘clean’ coal”. And pollution isn’t going to get any better by a leader pretending it’s not a real issue.

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  7. immortal_pirate 2 years ago

    Time is on my side…immortal.

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